Age Ranges

Ages and Activities

If you think Scouting’s just about knots, woggles and big shorts, then be prepared to be surprised. It’s how Richard Branson, Barack Obama and David Beckham got their start in life and you can benefit too.

There are 400,000 young people in Scouting, spread across five sections: Beaver Scouts, Cub Scouts, Scouts, Explorer Scouts and the Scout Network. Each section has its own balanced programme of activities, badges and awards.

Beavers (6–8)

Beaver Scouts are our youngest members. They usually meet weekly to take part in a wide range of activities including games, crafts, singing, visits and good turns, along with plenty of outdoor activities.

They will also have the opportunity to take part in the fun and excitement of camps and sleepovers. It may be the first time they spend a night away from home so it’s a real adventure for them.

Cubs (8-10½)

A Cub Scout Pack can have up to 36 Cub Scouts and is split into smaller groups called Sixes. Cubs take part in a wide range of activities designed to be interesting and challenging. A Cub Scout meeting consists of games and activities with plenty of time spent outdoors.

Camps and holidays are some of the most memorable events of the year for Cubs.

Scouts (10½–14)

Each Scout Troop consists of small units of six to eight Scouts called a Patrol, usually led by a Patrol Leader and Asisstant Patrol Leader. Outdoor activities feature prominently, with the highlights being camping and other adventurous activties. Throughout the year, Scouts learn various skills, such as map reading, camp cooking and first aid in preparation for camp.

Rock climbing, pot-holing, gliding, photography and international experiences are just some of the things they get up to.

Explorer Scouts (14–18)

Explorers are encouraged to lead themselves in deciding the programme
and direction of the Unit, with support and guidance from leaders. The section also includes the Young Leaders’ Scheme, where young people are able to take on a leadership role in one of the younger sections. Explorers begin are pushed to complete their Queens Scout Award, comprised of months of volunteering work, learning new skills and a lot of passion and dedication. The Queen Scout Award is as well-respected as the Gold Duke of Edinburugh award, seen highly by UCAS and college boards, even future employers.

There is wider scope for activities in Explorers, for example: offshore sailing, abseiling, aviation, public relations, performing, advanced first aid, parascending, mountaineering and expeditions.

Latest comments

23.11 | 13:56

Hello Mr Blair. (Grizzly) how's it going up North. I'm a old member of the Spartans, There isn't enough room to explain you can contact me on glenhoward@sky.com

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05.11 | 00:56

What happened to the 4th Spartans????????

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28.06 | 13:11

Had a great Cub Camp here a couple of weeks ago. Facilities good although outdoor space needs a bit of a tidy. Excellent location for sea front activities.

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11.09 | 18:34

We had a great stay in August, finding the facilities to be of a good standard and well priced. However, it'd've been useful to have a list of kitchen ware.

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